Sunday, February 26, 2017

How to manually add a shortcut to the Applications slingshot menu

Occasionally you find apps online that you want to use on elementary, but for some reason after install, they don't show up in the Applications menu.

For instance I just installed the Intel Graphics Update tool for this post, but the tool didn't install an icon in Applications. Do not despair.

One of the cool things about elementary and Linux in general is that it is highly customizable with just a little know-how.

I'm going to go through the process for adding a shortcut to the Intel Graphics driver to the Applications menu, but the same general steps can be used for any program you want to add.

1. Navigate to your home folder, then right-click and tick "Show Hidden files"

2. Then click into .local, then share, then applications.

3. Within this folder right click, then select New, then Empty File

4. Name the file anything-you-want.desktop. In this case, I named it intel.desktop


5. Then Open that file in Scratch (Right-click, Open in Scratch).

6. Paste the following in the file:
[Desktop Entry]
Name=
Exec=
Comment=
Icon=
Version=
Type=
Categories=

NOTE: These are just a few entries that can go into a .desktop file. There are many others that I have seen, but the ones here are the most common and will get the job done.

Name= Just put here whatever you want to call the file. For this example, I'm putting Intel Driver Update Tool

Exec= In this line, you want to put the command you would run in the terminal to open the program. For this example, I'll put: intel-graphics-update-tool

Comment= This is the place for a general descriptor that will display when you hover your mouse over the icon. Doesn't really matter what you put (or you could omit it entirely). I'll just put Update utility for Intel Graphics Driver

Icon= Add the path to the image you wish to display for the icon. In this case, the installer saved one here /usr/share/intel-graphics-update-tool/images/logo.png but it could be a path to anywhere on the system.

Version= Input the version of the program (or omit it.)

Type= I have always seen Application here.

Categories= Add here the categories that the application will appear in in Category view in the Applications

In this case I'll just add it to System Tools by adding System; to that line. So for my example, the completed file should look like this:

7. Save the file.

8. Now if you click on Applications and start typing "Intel" or click on the System Tools Category, you'll see the Intel Graphics tool. Click on it, and it will run!


Updating Intel graphics drivers in elementary

If you're running elementary on a machine with an Intel graphics chip (like my beloved System76 meerkat), you'll want to keep the graphics drivers up to date to make sure you're getting the most out of your system.

As far as I know there is no easy way to do this via the App Center or in System Settings, so you'll have to download it from the Intel website and install it yourself. It's easy enough to do (after all I did it) by doing the following:

1.
 Before attempting this, you need to make sure you have gdebi package manager installed. You can get it from the App Center.


2. Then navigate to https://01.org/linuxgraphics/downloads/intel-graphics-update-tool-linux-os-v2.0.2

3. Download the driver file: Intel® Graphics Update Tool 2.0.2 for Ubuntu* 16.04, 64-bit

4.
 Unpack the .deb file using gdebi

5. If you run the tool now, it will throw an error because it is configured to update Ubuntu only, not Ubuntu derivitaves.



We need to trick it into thinking we're running Ubuntu even though we are not. Don't worry, this is just temporary.

6. In the terminal, run sudo scratch-text-editor /etc/lsb-release
6(a). pop in your password

7. Scratch will then run the lsb-release file, which should look like this:
DISTRIB_ID="elementary"
DISTRIB_RELEASE=0.4
DISTRIB_CODENAME=loki
DISTRIB_DESCRIPTION="elementary OS 0.4 Loki"

8. Then modify that file with the following text:
DISTRIB_ID=Ubuntu
DISTRIB_RELEASE=16.04
DISTRIB_CODENAME=xenial
DISTRIB_DESCRIPTION="Ubuntu 16.04 LTS"

9. Ctrl+S and exit Scratch. Now you're ready to run the update.

10. The update tool DOES NOT put an icon in the slingshot menu (although you could make one), so you'll have to run it from the terminal by entering intel-graphics-update-tool

11.
 Pop in your password

12.
 Click Begin

13.
 Click Install

14. The utility will then go pull down the updates and install it. Once that's done, just click Close:
15. It will then prompt you to reboot. Click NO for the moment. We're going to go back and fix the lsb-release file first.

16. In the terminal, run sudo scratch-text-editor /etc/lsb-release
16(a). pop in your password

17. Scratch will then run the lsb-release file. Select all the text (Ctrl+a) and paste in the following:
DISTRIB_ID="elementary"
DISTRIB_RELEASE=0.4
DISTRIB_CODENAME=loki
DISTRIB_DESCRIPTION="elementary OS 0.4 Loki"


18. Ctrl+S and exit Scratch. Now reboot and you should be good to go!!



Thursday, September 8, 2016

How to enable minimize hotcorner on non-elementary distros. It is possible!!

Elementary doesn't have a minimize button by default, and that can be difficult to get used to since almost every other distro has a minimize button on the window controls.

Thankfully you can set a hotcorner to minimize the current window in Settings >> Desktop >> Hotcorners.

However, If you're not on elementary, you won't have the option to set a corner to minimize the current window, even if hotcorners are available to do other actions.

Until now...



To enable a hotcorner to minimize the current window in another distro, you just have to do the following:

1. Specify a keyboard shortcut in your System Settings for Minimize Window (eg: Ctrl+Shift+m).

2. Install xdotool;

3. Specify a hotcorner to Run a command;

4. Enter xdotool key Ctrl+Shift+m in the command box

Enjoy your hotcorner to minimize current window!!

Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Update!!

Because of persistent video issues in elementary Freya on this Meerkat, even after running the HW kernel updates, I am just running the OEM Ubuntu 16.04 with Unity.

I'm planning on getting back to blog posts after the release of 0.4 Loki.

Thanks for sticking around!!

Monday, August 22, 2016

How to change the clock format (workaround for Freya bug).

Elementary OS Freya has an applet to change the time format to the 12- or 24-hour clock in System Settings >> Date & Time. These settings are otherwise set by your Language and Region.

Changing this via the GUI doesn't actually change the time in the top bar. This is a bug that has been reported.



In the meantime, there is an easy fix via a terminal command:

To change the time displayed from 12 to 24-hour, simply open a Terminal (Super+T) and enter the following:

gsettings set com.canonical.indicator.datetime time-format '24-hour'

To go the other way (from 24-hour to 12 hour), just change '24-hour' in the above command to '12-hour'

That will permanently change the displayed time in the system, and it's just that easy! It would be nice if the devs could fix that System Settings bug!!

Saturday, August 20, 2016

How to get Deepin Music player working in elementary OS Freya

Deepin Music Player is designed by Linux Deepin team and it's a default audio player in Deepin OS. It has many cool features like a skinnable UI (like the old WinAMP), lyrics display, FM, online audio support and a mini mode.


Noobslab posted a walkthrough to get it working in "All Ubuntu and Linux Mint Versions," and I can install it without a hitch by using their method (just the usual add the ppa, update, install). However, when I try to run it from the Applications menu, it is unresponsive. When I run it from the terminal I get the following:
Gtk-Message: Failed to load module "pantheon-filechooser-module"
INFO Loading settings...
INFO Loading application theme...
INFO Loading MediaDB...
INFO Initialize Gui...
<class 'Xlib.protocol.request.QueryExtension'>
INFO MMKeys mode: gnome
Attempt to unlock mutex that was not locked
Aborted
This appears to be a bug in GTK itself making it incompatible with glib >= 2.41 (both from gnome...).

DISCLAIMER: I am not a trained professional. I am not a Linux, GTK, Gnome or any other sort of technological expert. USE THIS ADVICE AND MODIFY YOUR SYSTEM AT YOUR OWN RISK!!



By updating the sources list for Deepin to add the Vivid repositories, I was able to update some of the dependencies to get the program to work. Here's what I did:
1. Open Files as Administrator


2. Navigate to the deepin sources list located at /etc/apt/sources.list.d/noobslab-deepin-sc-trusty.list

3. Open it as administrator in Scratch and add the following repositories (I'm making you add them all because I can't remember which on the files are in that we need): 


deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ vivid main restricted
deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ vivid-updates main restricted
deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ vivid universe
deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ vivid-updates universe
deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ vivid multiverse
deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ vivid-updates multiverse
deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ vivid-backports main restricted universe multiverse
deb http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu vivid-security main restricted
deb http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu vivid-security universe
deb http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu vivid-security multiverse



AFTER THIS PROCESS IS OVER, GO BACK INTO THIS FILE AND REMOVE THE VIVID SOURCES!!!!!!!!!!!! Otherwise, if you upgrade your system (via sudo apt-get dist-upgrade) it could upgrade using these repos and break your system!!

4. In terminal, run [sudo apt-get update]

5. Then run [sudo apt-get install libglib2.0-0 libc-bin libgtk2.0-0] to install the updated libraries that Deepin Music needs.

6. Restart your computer (not sure if this is necessary, but I always do).

7. Run Deepin Music from the Applications menu and ENJOY!!